Route 66 - Glenrio - Historic Borderline Ghost Town

March 27, 2014

Route 66 - Glenrio - Historic Borderline Ghost Town, New Mexico and TexasRoute 66 - Glenrio - Historic Borderline Ghost Town, New Mexico and Texas - Click Photo For Gallery

Glenrio, New Mexico and Texas - Historic Borderline Ghost Town

The location of Glenrio on Texas and New Mexico's border led to some interesting business practices. At one point, all fuel was dispensed in Texas due to New Mexico's higher gasoline taxes. The 1930s State Line Bar and motel were built in New Mexico because Deaf Smith County, Texas was dry at the time The railroad station was in Texas. The local post office, built circa-1935, was in New Mexico. A water tank and windmill in New Mexico were constructed circa-1945.

The Joseph Brownlee House, constructed in Amarillo in 1930, was moved to Glenrio in 1950. Glenrio was the site of the "First Motel in Texas" / "Last Motel in Texas" (Homer Ehresman's family-run 1953 State Line Café and Gas Station and 1955 Texas Longhorn Motel, closed in 1976) and other businesses which straddled the state line on U.S. Route 66 for many years until Interstate 40 bypassed the community in September 1973.

Three filling stations (the 1925 Broyles Mobil station, a circa-1935 Texaco, and the 1946 Ferguson Gas Station) once operated in New Mexico.

Glenrio sits just a few yards to the south of Interstate 40 at Texas Exit 0 on Business
I-40, a road which turns into a local gravel road at the state line. This was the original Route 66 alignment between Glenrio and San Jon until 1952 and was paved for many years until Quay County removed the paving due to maintenance costs. Mail was formerly served by a post office on the New Mexico side of the town.

The town consists of the remains of the courtyard motel and related Texas Longhorn Café and Phillips 66 service station, the post office, a few other buildings including the diner and adjacent Texaco service station, the old Route 66 roadbed, and the former roadbed of the Rock Island Railroad, whose tracks were removed in the 1980s. A few homes still exist in Glenrio; the Joseph Brownlee House and an office in the Texas Longhorn Motel were the last to be occupied.

Glenrio has a very eerie feeling in a few years there will be no remains of the town whatsoever!  I have documented this town so it may living in history as others have done before me.

  - Ray Paul

 

 

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